Recruiting Employees in the Digital Age

Curriculum Vitae Recruitment Candidate Job Position

As in so many areas of our lives, recruiting employees has largely gone digital. Although finding the perfect fit is key to your company’s success, the recruiting process can be expensive, time-consuming and—let’s face it—downright frustrating! That is why we asked our TAB members and business coaches for business tips to help create this edition of business tips from the top. Today, we are focusing on how businesses have evolved their recruiting practices to take advantage of the tools and services available to us.

It should come as no surprise that LinkedIn (as well as other social media channels) has become a great recruiting resource. The best way to get started is to post an update letting your network know that you are looking to fill a position. You may not directly know someone who would be a perfect fit in your network, but friends-of-friends are great resources to get started with. Also post to the jobs section of the LinkedIn groups you are a member of, allowing you to reach a larger audience.

The Advanced Search function on LinkedIn can be used to search for people within your network that come up using relevant keywords. For example, if you need to hire an accounts receivable specialist, type “accounts receivable” into the search field to find connections in your network that have “accounts receivable” in their profile. This takes a little bit of time and effort, but does not cost a dime and can be very effective.

The next level in recruiting activities includes posting a paid job post on sites such as LinkedIn,, or Most of these sites provide different posting package levels for you to choose from. When choosing a job post site, consider:

  • Job post reach: Some services, such as, have partnered with other websites and local online publications to provide their client job posts greater online reach. Research whether your job post will just be visible on the specific site, or if they have partnered with other websites to promote job posts.
  • Pricing structure vs. your budget: Job posts can become pricey, so taking your recruiting budget into consideration is a must. Pricing structures vary greatly., for example, uses a pay-per-click pricing model, while others will charge a flat fee per job post.
  • Pricing structure vs. your recruiting needs: Consider the number of positions you are looking to fill. Most job board websites will provide a discount for purchasing multiple job posts at once to be used within a pre-determined period of time, usually 12 months.

Pro Business Tip: Branding your business for employee recruitment can be every bit as important as branding for awareness and client acquisition. Think about how your company’s social media pages and website communicate company culture and work environment to potential recruits.

Stay tuned, because next we’ll talk about qualifying and interviewing candidates. But for now, TAB’s Tips from the Top series is all about sharing advice. It’s your turn to share your advice with us! What recruiting techniques and tools are you using to find and attract the right talent?


5 Tips for Effective Digital Recruiting

Overhead View Of Two Businessmen Having Meeting In Office Lobby

In the increasingly cut-throat world of employee recruiting, businesses that fail to devise effective digital recruitment strategies face the threat of getting left behind in the dust. That’s because, as the vast majority of prospective job candidates are soon to come from the millennial generation, digital technology is the best way to “speak their language” and draw the interest of this highly sought-after talent pool.

Here are five tips for crafting a digital hiring strategy that yields better results than more traditional recruitment efforts:

1. Focus on creating a memorable first impression.

Before undertaking any other efforts, it’s critically important that your business website—and particularly, your “Careers” page—impress job seekers from the instant they land on your site. The look and feel should be engaging, upbeat and informative (and of course, easy to navigate). A cluttered or amateurish site instantly conveys the notion that a business doesn’t have its act together—and can discourage candidates from looking any further.

Think of your site as a “company storefront” where visitors are treated to a display of your culture and products. Such a storefront must “deliver a cohesive brand image that reflects the company mission, vision and values,” notes HR expert Amber Hyatt. The brand experience, combined with in-depth job descriptions and online applications, “engages job seekers and helps them determine proactively if they are a cultural fit for the organisation, and whether to apply.”

2. Showcase your brand on multiple platforms.

Remember, prospective candidates, come to your business from a wide array of online sources. Putting together a noteworthy company profile on LinkedIn is a necessary first step—with special attention paid to highlighting your company culture—but no business can afford to stop there. Your brand must have a significant presence, and following, on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram as well.

Maintaining a consistent message across various platforms is key. Since it’s your brand that “gives you the ultimate credibility,” be sure to “use the same banners, icons and style across the platforms and continue this theme into your website.” This way, your brand and messaging are familiar wherever job seekers encounter them.

3. Focus on providing content that engages and informs.

Both on your business and career sites, and in your social media outreach efforts, pay close attention to the kind of content you offer to followers. Tweets, posts, articles, etc., should reflect your company’s upbeat, employee-friendly culture. In order to reach the widest possible audience, mix things up with a blend of images, short videos, surveys, and so on that engage job candidates and keep them coming back for more.

4. Make the online job application process quick and easy to complete.

If you successfully grab the interest of a prospective candidate, don’t make the mistake of putting obstacles in the way of completing your online job applications. A variety of technology options should be considered, from dedicated candidate job portals to employee referral networks—anything that leverages integrated platforms to ease the application process. (Additionally, this will impress job seekers looking for companies proficient in digital technology.)

5. Incorporate big data in your recruiting efforts.

The same “big data” technology used to attract new customers can be applied to your recruiting efforts. Look into high-quality recruitment analytics programs that gather key data such as:

  • Typical applicant online behaviour
  • Job website visits
  • Job description searches
  • Favorite social media platforms
  • Profile updates on LinkedIn, Facebook, etc.

“In the near future, most HR departments (many large companies already do) will have access to considerable pools of data that can tell a recruiter more about candidates than they know about themselves,” writes marketing specialist Aleah Radovich.

Adding a “digital dimension” to your recruiting strategies will broaden the range and scope of potential candidates, including the right type of talented individuals you want in your business.


5 Tips on Engaging Your Remote Employees

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Chances are, you employ — or are considering employing — some of the growing numbers of talented men and women who opt to work remotely. Offsite workers comprise an increasingly large segment of the workforce, with as many as 63 million employees working remotely in 2016.

Why this exponential growth? Progressive-thinking CEOs and business owners recognise that a remote team “allows you to source employees — and contract, specialist workers — from all over the world, increasing your talent pool, as well as your company’s global perspective.”

Of course, managing remote employees can be a challenge, in terms of productivity and engagement. Perhaps the single most daunting aspect is the element of isolation. After all, due to their geographical distance, these employees aren’t available to participate in casual workplace encounters, impromptu meetings in the CEO’s office or on-site brainstorming sessions.

“Workers who are more removed from the physical workplace have fewer opportunities for casual interaction with their managers and coworkers,” notes management consultant Darleen DeRosa. “Over time, this can lead remote workers to feel less valued and less satisfied with their jobs.”

So even if you’ve recruited the best remote employees in the global talent pool, if they’re not engaged in their jobs (and therefore feel less motivated and productive), how can they help your business grow?

Here are actionable tips you can take to ensure your remote workforce is aligned with (and enthusiastic about) your onsite company culture:

1. Leverage technology to stay in touch. There’s nothing quite like the casual conversations employees have onsite, both with each other and with their managers, but with the advent of chat tools and video conferencing, it’s possible to replicate informal lines of communication with your remote workers. Using tools like Skype, GoToMeeting, Google Hangouts, etc., encourages offsite employees to contact you with project-related questions or let them know you’ll “drop in” on them from time to time, just to touch base or get answers to your own questions. Video conferencing enables both sides to have some valuable face-time, which furthers a sense of involvement all around.

2. Always include remote workers in onsite meetings. There’s a tendency to forget or overlook remote team members in your weekly or bi-weekly staff meetings. Get these meetings on their schedule, so they can actively participate with ideas and feedback. This, too, makes them feel more like part of the team.

“Just as important, when you’re handing out assignments, brainstorming or discussing solutions to problems, remember to include remote employees in the process,” suggests business technology writer Minda Zetlin.

3. Schedule face-to-face meetings. It may not always be practical, but particularly with newly hired remote employees, look for opportunities to schedule a face-to-face meeting in the workplace—or if a manager happens to be travelling near where the remote employee is based. Even a single in-person encounter helps cement a successful working relationship and lays the groundwork for a more engaged attitude with the team.


4. Keep them in the loop with your company newsletter. Maintaining contact through a regularly scheduled newsletter is another great way to boost offsite employee engagement. Content for the newsletter can range from informative (news about product launches, companywide initiatives, etc.) to informal (holiday greetings, updates on physical renovations, etc.).

Consider spotlighting an employee with each issue, so remote workers learn new things about their team members. Or spotlight a high-performing offsite employee, so people in your office better understand the contributions these remote workers are making to the business.

5. Incorporate recognition of offsite employee contributions and milestones. Recognition of remote employees’ contributions doesn’t have to be limited to a company newsletter. Include a public acknowledgement of significant offsite achievements in staff meetings. Salute remote workers’ efforts on your company’s social media networks. When an employment milestone occurs, send them an e-card or offer a digital rewards program where they can choose a gift online. These efforts reinforce the sense among your virtual workforce that “we’re all in this together.”

When it comes to remote employee engagement, “out of sight, out of mind” is a constant peril. But promoting communications and collaboration with these employees is worth your investment of time and effort. As Darleen DeRosa reminds us, “To allow teams to succeed in a workplace that is increasingly remote, employers need to take extra care to do the things that come more naturally in a face-to-face environment.”


Recruiting through Social Media: A Quick Guide

recruiting on social media

Increasingly, businesses in search of talented job candidates are turning to social media as part of their overall recruitment strategy. “Social recruiting” seeks to leverage the power of various social media platforms to strengthen an employer brand, attract interest among qualified job-seekers, and build a pipeline of talent to tap into for future growth.

If your business already has an active social media profile, it’s no great leap to expand into social recruiting. If not, you may be losing out in the “talent wars” to other, more nimble competitors.

Here’s a quick primer on essentials related to social recruiting for your business:

Promote your brand on all platforms. Everything you post on your company’s website and social media platforms—from blog posts to company news, images and videos—should be filtered through the lens of brand awareness and company culture. Always gauge the potential impact of your content through the eyes of prospective employees. Is what you’re posting likely to attract them or turn them off? Are you portraying your business as a place where people would like to work or are you discouraging further interest?

Seek out and establish relationships with influencers. Just as it’s important to engage in influencer marketing, so you can boost your recruitment efforts by building ties with influencers in the realm of social recruiting. Seek out industry influencers with sizable networks, share their content and offer content of your own. As the relationships grow, you can begin touting job opportunities in your company—reaching a far greater audience than might otherwise be possible.

Get active on millennial-focused platforms. Sure, it’s important to be active on Facebook and Twitter, but you won’t necessarily generate a lot of interest there among millennials. Take time to explore Snapchat, Instagram and other sites where millennials “hang out.” Building your presence on these sites can result in greater brand awareness among the job-seekers you most wish to attract.

Encourage your current workforce to generate leads. Employee referrals are always a promising source for potentially qualified job candidates. Take this a step further by encouraging employees to promote open job opportunities via their own social media networks.

“Simply talking casually about enjoying a company vacation, feeling supported at work, or being glad about something that the employer is doing for them can make an impression on their followers,” notes “But you want it to be genuine.”

Look to the future. Social recruiting bears only a cursory resemblance to recruiting employees “back in the day.” In today’s era, cultivating relationships is just as important as lining up applicants for your latest job opening. Whether you expend your efforts on LinkedIn, Facebook or other sites, the key is nurturing a pipeline of qualified candidates—individuals who show an interest in your company by following you on social media, commenting on your posts, sharing content with others—and then reaching out to those candidates when the time is right.

In many ways, social media has dramatically altered the way business gets done. It’s also an increasingly useful resource for attracting the right people from the emerging talent pool and putting those talents to use in your company.

Want more advice on recruiting and retaining and developing great employees? Letting your new prospective employee know that they will be allocated an expert business coach is a very attractive and increasing common proposition. They will recognise that you are a progressive employer and willing to invest significantly in their future.  Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!


5 Small Ways Entrepreneurs Can Save Big

One business can have a hundred objectives, but at the root of each mission is the company’s bottom line. The more profit the company turns, the more it can achieve and the more it can give back to its leader, employees, clients, and community.

While figuring out ways to make money is on the forefront of most business owners’ minds, many are forgetting the importance of saving. Here are 5 cost-saving ideas for businesses:

1. Understand the “why” of each expense.

According to TAB Fraser Valley President Rod Woodcock, cutting costs begins exactly where all other business decisions should – the company’s strategic plan. Before making a purchasing decision, Woodcock suggests business owners “challenge every line in their operating statement to TRULY understand what the expense is bringing the company.”

2. Charge for expenses.

Businesses owners should not be afraid to charge clients for the tools required to provide the best possible product/service. For example, if you bring in a credit card system to streamline payment processes, charge for it. “If credit card fees are 1.5%, raise prices 1.5%,” Woodcock says.

3. Maximise current employees before hiring new ones.

When demand spikes, entrepreneurs are often too quick to bring on new hires. Not only does hiring cost time and money, but you risk bringing on unnecessary hires who will serve as little more than an added expense once demand plateaus. Woodcock recommends maximising the output of existing employees before hiring to accommodate growth in demand. “Drive to 110% for an extended period before expanding fixed costs,” he says.

His top tip for achieving this is investing in the education and/or technology to help employees accomplish more with less — don’t just push them, give them the tools to be more efficient.

4. Look at the numbers.

As with all things business, the proof is in the numbers. The Alternative Board San Antonio President John Dini recommends using “common size” income statements as fast and easy analytical tools. “It can be difficult to identify appropriate expenses when your business is growing,” says Dini. “Print a report showing the last few years side by side, with each expense item measured as a percentage of sales (QuickBooks can do this). Looking at how the expense increases or decreases in relation to your revenues can be illuminating.”

For example, Dini adds, “If sales increased over the last two years from €1,976,433 to €2,152,555, and your freight costs increased from €51,387 to €66,729, is that better or worse? Seeing that shipping, as a percentage of sales, went from 2.6% to 3.1% is a half-point off your margins — and actionable information.”

5. Use Your Accountant Wisely

Many business owners are unintentionally losing money because they aren’t keeping accurate records of their spending. If finances aren’t your strong suit, it might be time to call in a pro. David Wechsler, Vice President of The Alternative Board Denver West suggests that business owners “hire a bookkeeper or accountant that has some familiarity with your industry.” Wechsler notes that entrepreneurs need to take advantage of their accountant’s expertise in order to save the most. “Use your financial professional wisely. You are not paying someone north of €75 per hour to do data entry; you are paying them for guidance, compliance, and peace of mind that your financial house is in order.”

Take a moment to reflect on your personal vision of success. Whether it focuses on profits, work-life balance, or bringing about change, your company’s bottom line plays an influential role in the pursuit of your long-term goals. It’s very common for hidden business costs to prevent business owners from reaching the profits they need to make their vision a reality. These cost saving ideas for businesses can make or break your strategic plan.

The Alternative Board works with small business owners to help them define their personal vision of success and develop a strategy – financial and otherwise – for achieving it. Contact a local board to see how a community of business owners can help you refocus your finances and help you get out of your business exactly what you want from it.