Leadership Tips to Systematise Your Business


At some point, every business must impose a systematic structure on its operations or risk losing untold amounts of time and money on inefficiency and lapses in productivity. Having systems in place not only guards against these negative factors, it helps businesses expand with fewer difficulties because everyone in the organisation understands how things get done and who the ultimate customer or end-user is.

“Anything performed in your company at least twice needs a proven system,” notes efficiency expert Nancy Gaines. “Anything performed three times or more should be automated.”

Low-level business systems that get repeated (and should, therefore, be automated) range from lead generation and social media marketing to client onboarding, employee recruiting and inventory management. High-level areas that cry out for more detailed systematising, Gaines says, include sales, marketing, HR functions and front- and back-office activities.

How should you as CEO or business owner get the systematising process rolling?

Identify and evaluate all existing systems. Instruct a key team leader to compile a list of all existing business operations with the goal of asking fundamental questions about each one:

  • Why does this system exist?
  • What specific purpose does it serve?
  • What challenges does the system overcome?
  • How does it contribute to the growth of the business?

Get your employees involved. For many, if not most, business operations, your employees are the ones who know “how things work.” As part of the systematising (or mapping) process, involve them in identifying issues that prevent a smooth running of the business, such as paperwork bottlenecks or procedural roadblocks. This information is crucial for improving business systems.

Ask employees to identify and record daily, repetitive tasks for one week. A compilation of all employee records of their week’s activities should give you a clear idea of where they all fit into the bigger picture.

Pinpoint customers and end-users for all systems. No matter what the process or system is, there should always be an end-user in mind–customers (internal or external) or vendor. A system that has no such end-user is a good candidate for elimination. It follows, therefore, that individual employees or a team should know precisely what that end-user wants (quality of product/service, turnaround or delivery time, etc.), in order to provide better service.

Identify which systems aren’t operating efficiently. In most businesses, certain processes consume the most time, money and employee effort. When these systems are dysfunctional, this consumption is far out of proportion to the return on investment. (This is especially true if the business owner or CEO is continually called upon to intervene and “repair” the situation.) Any such broken system is a good place to start the comprehensive systematising process.

Document high-end systems. Some attempts at systematisation get bogged down in the effort to document all systems within the company. Generally speaking, this isn’t necessary for low-level operations and automated functions. Instead, focus on thoroughly documenting your high-end systems (sales, employee recruiting, inventory management, etc.), so that everyone involved understands the most efficient way to achieve objectives in these areas.

You’ll find this particularly helpful when introducing new employees to the process. Detailed documentation removes the time-wasting component wherein people keep asking questions about process and procedure, instead of actually getting the work done. With documented procedures, the learning curve is much quicker.

Businesses that systematise their operations and eliminate “broken” ways of doing things are better positioned for growth than their less-organised competitors. And they’ll likely outperform in key areas such as product quality and consistent customer service.

Want more advice on systematizing your business or sales and marketing or general advice from other business owners like you? Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!


Use Technology to Enhance Your Employee Communications Efforts

Technology and communication

If improving communications with your employees was on your 2018 list of resolutions, there are many ways to leverage digital technology to achieve this goal. Businesses that still rely on a “suggestion box” in the break room or some similarly out-of-date mechanism should consider adopting current technology to make employees feel more involved and part of the team.

An array of Digital Resources

The good news is, your employees are already using the types of digital resources you can employ in your efforts to improve communications. These resources include:

  • Texting
  • Chat rooms
  • Video
  • Social media

Instant messaging is so prevalently used by people (from front-line employees to senior executives) that it should be considered a “go-to” method for communicating important and timely information to your team. It’s also a useful tool for staying in touch with your remote workers.

Cloud-based mobile technology facilitates a deeper sense of engagement among employees. Using communications tools in this area usually includes the benefits of enhanced data security. Also, cloud-based technology can be easily upgraded as new digital improvements become available.

Video platforms represent a particularly appealing way of improving communications. When you, as CEO or business owner, want to relay a message to the entire company, what better way than through video, where people can see and hear you simultaneously? No other mode offers the same kind of “face-to-face” authenticity – especially beneficial if you’re comfortable in front of a camera and know how to express yourself in terms your employees will best understand.

Getting Employees on Board

To make this approach work, it’s critically important to design a comprehensive plan that introduces and familiarizes employees with the communications technology you deem best suited for your culture. According to ITProPortal, such a plan should include “training programmes, leadership workshops, counselling, best practices resources, templates, and customised advice and guidance.”

This may sound burdensome at first, but when employees “get” that you want to implement a streamlined system of communications – and that you genuinely care about interacting with them – you’re likely to see a marked improvement in morale and, possibly, long-term employee retention.

Employee Solutions to Business Problems

Equally valuable are opportunities for team members to communicate with each other. For example, those involved in a new initiative – or tasked with finding solutions to a pressing business problem – will greatly benefit from being able to bounce ideas off each other in real-time.

Remember, your employees are the ones most intimately involved in the sales and distribution of your products or services. Frequently, they’re also the ones who regularly interact with customers, so they have a deeper understanding of the strengths and shortcomings of your offerings. If they’re asked to devise a solution, the chance to collaborate quickly and clearly through internal communications tools may result in just the solution your business needs to move forward.

At the same time, this communications platform should involve supervisors or managers as well. Great employee ideas can wither and die without managerial input and/or advocacy.

As Fast Company notes, “It’s important that new concepts are not just discussed among peers.” Managers should “be involved and feel connected to those suggestions from the very beginning,” because their advocacy can help ensure that those at the top will “implement the best ideas.”

Businesses armed with effective internal communications are often more successful at attracting and recruiting the quality talent your company seeks as well. That’s another reason to examine your various communications options and put the best system in place, in order to keep your employees productive and able to share key ideas with one another.

Want to learn more about the technology and communications? Find out if a TAB Board is right for you!


You Don’t Have a Website?

Your website is the face of your company. The importance of a good website can’t be overemphasised.

If you think a website is not important to your business, you haven’t thought it through. Potential employees, investors, suppliers, customers and other stakeholders will all research your website before they contact you. You may not know what opportunities you are missing if you don’t have a website


Websites That Attract & Convert

Vector Set Of Line Flat Design Banners For Conversion Rate Optim

Your website is most likely the most important online (and possibly offline, too) real estate your company owns. Websites not only provide information and validation for your products and services but are also an effective branding and lead generation engine when used correctly. This edition of business tips from the top comes from business leaders like you to focus on how to optimise your company website to attract visitors and convert them into leads.


Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is used to obtain high-ranking placement in the search results page of a search engine (from Webopedia.com) and is crucial to the success and visibility of your site—if you want your target market to find you online. SEO is complicated, time-consuming, and optimisation parameters change often. Unless you have the knowledge base and talent already in-house, SEO optimisation is an activity that is best outsourced.  This service can often be expensive and, as so many things in life, you get what you pay for.

Keep your website content current and timely. Updating your site content periodically will not only keep your site fresh for prospect validation purposes but will also help increase your site SEO rankings in search engines. One really simple way to do this is to attach a blog to your website and blog regularly. Not only will this position you as an expert in your market, but it will also signal to search engines that fresh, relevant content is being published to your site regularly. Create a blog posting schedule for yourself and stick to it. At a bare minimum, your company should post a blog once a week.

If you haven’t done so already, set up a Google Analytics account for your website. This is a free tool that—at a bare minimum—allows you to track the number of visits to your site, page views and bounce rates. On a more advanced level, you can use Google Analytics to set up goals, tracking where traffic is coming from and how well visitors are converting into leads.

Pro Business Tip: Tracking these metrics carefully will provide you with the basis for where you can prioritise and focus your web optimization efforts. Your basic goal should be to increase traffic and conversation rates while decreasing your bounce rate.


Log In a Lot

Make sure you know your log-in credentials for every single piece of equipment that requires passwords (machines, servers, computers, tablets) and log in to them quarterly to make sure they still work. This practice will surface any hacking, fraud or ransomware situations so you can fix them