Recruiting Employees in the Digital Age

Curriculum Vitae Recruitment Candidate Job Position

As in so many areas of our lives, recruiting employees has largely gone digital. Although finding the perfect fit is key to your company’s success, the recruiting process can be expensive, time-consuming and—let’s face it—downright frustrating! That is why we asked our TAB members and business coaches for business tips to help create this edition of business tips from the top. Today, we are focusing on how businesses have evolved their recruiting practices to take advantage of the tools and services available to us.

It should come as no surprise that LinkedIn (as well as other social media channels) has become a great recruiting resource. The best way to get started is to post an update letting your network know that you are looking to fill a position. You may not directly know someone who would be a perfect fit in your network, but friends-of-friends are great resources to get started with. Also post to the jobs section of the LinkedIn groups you are a member of, allowing you to reach a larger audience.

The Advanced Search function on LinkedIn can be used to search for people within your network that come up using relevant keywords. For example, if you need to hire an accounts receivable specialist, type “accounts receivable” into the search field to find connections in your network that have “accounts receivable” in their profile. This takes a little bit of time and effort, but does not cost a dime and can be very effective.

The next level in recruiting activities includes posting a paid job post on sites such as LinkedIn,  Monster.com, or Indeed.com. Most of these sites provide different posting package levels for you to choose from. When choosing a job post site, consider:

  • Job post reach: Some services, such as Monster.com, have partnered with other websites and local online publications to provide their client job posts greater online reach. Research whether your job post will just be visible on the specific site, or if they have partnered with other websites to promote job posts.
  • Pricing structure vs. your budget: Job posts can become pricey, so taking your recruiting budget into consideration is a must. Pricing structures vary greatly. Indeed.com, for example, uses a pay-per-click pricing model, while others will charge a flat fee per job post.
  • Pricing structure vs. your recruiting needs: Consider the number of positions you are looking to fill. Most job board websites will provide a discount for purchasing multiple job posts at once to be used within a pre-determined period of time, usually 12 months.

Pro Business Tip: Branding your business for employee recruitment can be every bit as important as branding for awareness and client acquisition. Think about how your company’s social media pages and website communicate company culture and work environment to potential recruits.

Stay tuned, because next we’ll talk about qualifying and interviewing candidates. But for now, TAB’s Tips from the Top series is all about sharing advice. It’s your turn to share your advice with us! What recruiting techniques and tools are you using to find and attract the right talent?

 

How to Lead and Inspire Older Employees

FAN2038498It wasn’t always the case, but these days many business owners and CEOs are younger than the workforce they lead and manage. A “one-size-fits-all” leadership style is therefore likely to result in a troubled workplace environment since it fails to consider key differences in dealing with employees of the Baby Boomer generation or even with Gen-Xers.

But if you’re a young leader who truly wishes to lead and inspire your team, here are tips for bridging the generational gap and bringing out the best in your employees.

Acknowledge that differences exist.

There’s nothing to be gained by pretending a person in her twenties has the same outlook and skillset as another person in her forties or fifties. Start by recognising differences in perspectives so you can work toward coalescing different-aged employees into a cohesive team.

Don’t make assumptions.

Do you ever look at an older employee and automatically assume they’re “too old to change” or “can’t keep up with the times”? That’s prejudicial thinking and works against any leader hoping to motivate their workforce. Instead, consider the wealth of experience an older employee has and focus on his or her ability and willingness to learn new things.

Provide context for planned changes.

Yes, some older workers may resist a new company-wide initiative, if only because they’re wary of change in general. Often, this resistance stems from a lack of understanding about the “why” behind the new approach. Offering context helps answer questions and generates a fresh way of looking at a change that many older employees will embrace.

Take a flexible approach to communications.

Texting or email may be your preferred mode of expression, but you’ll have better luck reaching out in person with older staff who like face-to-face communications. Business author and speaker Ray Pelletier urges young CEOs and leaders who want to give feedback to employees to “get up from your desk and walk over to them to give it.” He adds: “The more human contact you give them, the more respect they’ll have for you.”

Don’t present yourself as “knowing it all.”

An older employee will naturally resent any young person, CEO or not, who gives off a know-it-all vibe. (Chances are, no employee of any age will warm to this leadership style.) Counter this impression by being both approachable and coachable. Take advantage of a seasoned employee’s perspective and ask questions aimed at getting beneath the surface of a workplace issue or challenge.

“Having members from different generations means more viewpoints and creativity—which gives your business an advantage—so use it,” says Nicole Laurrari, president of The EGC Group. “You can never over-communicate that everyone’s opinion and ideas count.”

You can build immense reservoirs of goodwill and trust with this approach. Employees will greatly appreciate that you value their hard-earned knowledge and will likely feel more motivated to please you.

Put them in charge of projects.

Laurrari also suggests giving a qualified older employee a leadership role in important projects. This person may not take the same approach as you would, but with their skills and experience, “they can bring viable solutions to the table that others members of the team may not have thought of.”

Invite an older employee to be a mentor.

Depending on the workplace environment, asking an older employee to mentor someone on the team might yield highly beneficial results.

You might also suggest they “present their expertise at lunch-and-learns and team meetings,” says HR professional Kazim Ladimeji. This sends the signal to younger employees that it’s worth their time to “approach more experienced workers for their insights and knowledge.”

Your chief objective as business owner and leader is to mould a team and forge strong connections between yourself and your employees. An open-minded, inclusive and sharing leadership style—aimed at everyone in the company, but especially older, wary employees—will pay off with a workforce that understands “we’re all in this together,” regardless of differences in age, perspective and experience.