End of Life Policy on your data and GDPR 

Does your GDPR have a plan for what happens to data storage media, ie, your hard drives, DAT tapes, floppy drives,  smartphones etc. at end of life? The only absolutely secure way is to shred the drives, tapes and smartphones in an industrial shredder such as what we have at Electronic Recycling. If it’s not shredded it is not secure. For those interested in sustainability, we also have an option of securely shredding the data and saving the drive should your drive be reusable.

Brendan Palmer – TAB member Owner www.Electronic-Recycling.ie

 

Your Strategic Plan Should Begin with a Personal Vision

strategic plan

In a privately-owned business, the strategic plan for a company is not based solely on the assumption that the company’s goals and vision are to maximise profit. The strategic plan for your company must begin with your personal goals and vision.

The problem of balancing lifestyle versus being the driving force in a growing business is a common dilemma among owners of privately-owned businesses.

Let me tell you a story that illustrates this point. A TAB member had grown her business from nothing to one doing over €3 million a year within three years. She was taking home over €100,000 a year. She hired a consultant to help her company develop a strategic plan for its growth. The plan laid out the steps necessary to grow the company into an operation with €15 million in annual sales in five years. The consultant showed her how the company would then have a value of over €9 million once the five-year objectives are met.

She told her TAB board of the strategic plan and expressed a personal uneasiness with the company goals. She explained that she was very content with the money she was making. She wanted to work fewer hours, not more. She also didn’t want to bring someone else into the company to run it. Nor did she want to do the travelling that would be necessary to reach the five-year goal. The advice of the group was to redo the company strategic plan so that it would, first of all, satisfy her personal vision, goals and plans. The revised strategic plan resulted in goals that maintained rather than increased the annual revenue, reduced some overhead and enabled her to commit less time to the company.

Do not ignore your personal vision when creating your company strategic plan. Too many business people have been caught up in the push to grow their companies, and they wind up miserable.

Many successful business owners that I have met say if they had to do it all again, they would take more time for themselves. I know that it is much easier to say after accomplishing what they have already achieved, but in advising other business people today, I recommend getting to know yourself first. Find out what will make you happy. After that point, you will be able to determine your business vision, strategic plan and goals that will point you and your business in the direction that will make you happy.

What is YOUR Personal Vision?

Learn how to integrate it into your strategic plan

 

4 Ways to Handle a Workplace Bully

 

 

 

workplace bully

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An alarming 75 percent of employees reported a loss of motivation due to the stress caused by an abrasive manager, according to a study by coaching firm Executive Confidante. As if that weren’t shocking enough, 44 percent of those surveyed actually left an employer because of workplace bullying. These statistics show how your company could be susceptible to the problem, but there are steps you can take to minimise or prevent the tension caused by a workplace bully.

Executive Confidante’s owner, Kalli Matsuhashi, specialises in identifying, preventing and eliminating workplace bullying. We asked her to explain four common methods of dealing with bullies as well as what business owners and employees might realistically expect from these tactics. Here’s what she had to say.

Working for an abrasive manager (AKA workplace bully) is almost always a very stressful and trying situation. Assuming the abrasive manager will continue their bullying ways, there are really only a few ways to minimise the resulting stress.

  1. Ignore the workplace bully. It’s almost impossible to ignore an abrasive manager – they’re usually right on top of things, trying to intimidate people into better performance. One can try to ignore the bullying behaviour and recognise that it isn’t personal – it’s usually a reflection of the manager feeling threatened or worried about demonstrating good results to those above him or her in the hierarchy. This is much easier said than done, however. Work to ignore the bullying behaviour – by seeing it for what it is – but not the boss himself/herself.
  1. Isolate yourself from the workplace bully. Many people take this approach – 63% according to research by Christine Porath and Christine Pearson in their study on incivility in the workplace. This protects the individual from the wrath of the bullying boss but has other consequences that in the end could cause the individual to lose his/her job. This approach reduces teamwork and collaboration and ultimately leads to poorer job performance and lower productivity.
  1. Observe and implement strategies co-workers have used to deal with the workplace bully. It is the rare individual who is able to stand up to the abrasive manager and gain his or her respect to the point where the bullying no longer occurs. This means that the majority of people working for a bullying boss will have employed strategy one or two above – neither of which works very well. Observing others that have managed to either not get fired or to have proven able to somehow withstand the stress of the situation is a good idea – more likely than not, however, these long-term employees are suffering greatly and are unable to perform well. If the workplace bullying is a long-standing issue, the best remedy may be to leave the employer.
  1. Report the workplace bully to HR. The one obvious solution that has not been discussed as much is to report the issue to HR or other managers. This too is unlikely to lead to change, but at least draws some attention to the issue internally, and the more people speak up, the more likely real change will occur.

While the potential dangers of workplace bullying are very real and too complex to solve in a simple blog post, the tactics above represent common approaches to diffuse a negative situation. For a more nuanced look into the issue as well as in-depth advice and answers to workplace bully FAQ, please watch Kalli’s free B.O.S.S. webinar – Workplace Bullying: How Much Is It Costing Your Company?